Tag Archives: health

The Skinny on Thanksgiving – 5 Tips to Lighten Up Your Holiday Meal

27 Nov
  1. Engage in some sort of exercise early in the day and you’ll sleep better at night.  A brisk 30-minute walk is all you need to burn some quick calories and feel energized.  You’re in luck if it’s a sunny day – soak in some Vitamin D!  If you have a bit more time, hop on a bike or go for a quick hike.  Just thinking about all those delicious “sides” to sample later should be all the motivation you need to get up, out the door and moving.
  2. Don’t deny yourself, dig in and sample everything from the flaky fresh biscuits to the sweet potato pie, but limit your portion sizes.  Check out WebMD®’s Portion Size Plate, an interesting visual take on portion control.  You can even download a handy wallet-size version.
  3. Drink water.  Simple.  Calorie-free.  Don’t fill up on empty calories!  OK, maybe one glass of wine, it is a holiday after all.
  4. Who doesn’t love a heavenly smoked Gouda or a buttery Manchego?  Step away from the cheese plate.  Go for lighter appetizers like the colorful veggie platter or grab a salad.
  5. Or, disregard the four tips above and simply eat “lighter” on Friday.  Feel like having a second helping of homemade stuffing?  Yes, thank you.  It takes 3,500 unburned calories to pack on an extra pound.  Chances are indulging in just one big meal will not prevent you from fitting into your skinny jeans, your boyfriend jeans or your comfy leggings on Friday.

As you begin to digest your Thanksgiving feast, you may feel a bit sleepy.  Especially if you’re the host with a house full of guests, a sink full of dishes and an assortment of leftovers to fit back into your refrigerator.

This is the perfect opportunity to sneak in a quick nap on the couch or better yet, slip away to your Shifman mattress.  We think you’ll have the most restful post-Thanksgiving catnap of your life.  Wake up refreshed, rejoin your guests and dive into that slice of homemade pumpkin pie.  You did save room for pie, right?

Happy Thanksgiving from Shifman  Mattress Company.

happy-thanksgiving

Sleep: Who Needs it More?

8 Mar

© Copyright 2010 CorbisCorporationDo women need more sleep than men? “Yes!” says  Jim Horne, author of Sleepfaring: A Journey through the Science of Sleep. Horne explains that women need about twenty more minutes of sleep than men each night. “Women tend to multi-task  –  they do lots at once and are flexible  –  and so they use more of their actual brain than men do. Because of that, their sleep need is greater.”

While women are supposed to be getting the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep each night, many women are actually chronically sleep-deprived. Aside from the daily grind, there are many other biological factors that affect a woman’s quality of sleep such as:

  •  Pregnancy: Most women experience discomfort from weight gain and the position of the fetus.
  •  Hot flashes due to menopause
  •  Anxiety and stress – (Science Daily reports that women have higher anxiety than men due to cell signals and hormones).

If women have a more difficult time sleeping, but also need more sleep than men, what can be done? The National Sleep Foundation recommends that women combat insomnia by limiting their caffeine and alcohol intake, increasing their daily exercise, and setting a routine sleep schedule.

Also, investing in a comfortable mattress will help improve an individual’s sleep environment, allowing for both comfort and relaxation.

Women of world: take a nap. Statistics show you need it!

Sleep and be well!

Hallo-Lean

17 Oct

Ahhh… the onset of Halloween. Endless bowls of candy replace your summer decor as the inevitable commencement of the holiday season subtly inches closer and closer.

Temperatures begin to fall, the days get shorter — and people put on weight. And aside from the obvious reasons why people gain weight –less exercise & heartier meals– a study reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that chronically sleep deprived individuals are more likely to store fat than their well rested counterparts. Further, the study noted that those who were sleep deprived were also at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

YIKES! Now that’s something to scream over.

According to the study, not getting enough sleep reduces your fat cells’ ability to respond properly to the hormone insulin, which is crucial for regulating energy storage. So, in the same way that your brain becomes groggy when you’re sleepy, your fat cells do, too!

Are YOU getting enough sleep?

David Neubauer, associate director of the Johns Hopkins Sleep Disorders Center said: “The study reinforces the importance of good sleep generally in promoting health… [The study] is an important step in our understanding of the relationship of sleep and physiological functioning, particularly regarding the increased risk for type 2 diabetes and obesity in people who have inadequate sleep.”

So the next time you’re straining to keep your eyes open to watch a little more late-night television, surrender! Just let sleep do its thing.

Go to Sleep! You need it.

10 May

Are you really getting enough sleep? Some people say they only need a few hours of sleep while others exclaim “they’ll sleep when they’re dead!” (Yikes!) As a society that focuses on working hard all day and night, we often pride ourselves on not getting enough sleep. We’ve even conditioned ourselves into thinking that we deserve bragging rights for pulling all-nighters!

So where does this basis of thinking stem from? Some researchers say childhoodand more specifically, those times we were reprimanded for acting out and sent to bed early. Think about it: our parents punished us by sending us to sleep! As a result, when we are conditioned into thinking that something is a punishment, we simply refuse to obey those constraints and immediately rebel. And the rebellion, in this case, is staying awake. The problem with this sorry scheme, however, is that we only hurt ourselves.

Daniel J. Buysse, a psychiatrist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a past president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, believes that out of every 100 people who believe they only need five or six hours of sleep a night, only about five people really do.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that one-third of Americans are chronically sleep deprived, receiving less than 7 hours of sleep per night. Sleep deprivation puts these people at a higher risk of diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and other health problems.

It’s important to remember that sleep plays a vital role in promoting physical health and emotional wellness. Staying awake to complete tasks can be quite a disservice to your health. So next time you feel yourself fighting the urge to sleep, stop rebelling and surrender yourself to the bliss and benefits of serene slumber.

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